Listen to RFI News
Expand Player
 
Listen Download Podcast
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 06/18 13h00 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 06/17 13h00 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 06/14 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/05 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/04 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/03 13h00 GMT
To take full advantage of multimedia content, you must have the Flash plugin installed in your browser. To connect, you need to enable cookies in your browser settings. For an optimal navigation, the RFI site is compatible with the following browsers: Internet Explorer 8 and above, Firefox 10 and +, Safari 3+, Chrome 17 and + etc.

South African novelist Mphuthumi Ntabeni shines a light on the Xhosa narrative

South African novelist Mphuthumi Ntabeni shines a light on the Xhosa narrative
 
South African novelist Mphuthumi Ntabeni, author of "The Broken River Tent" M. Ntabeni

In this month's Africa: Stories in the 55, South African writer Mphuthumi Ntabeni describes his twenty-year journey into the mind of Maqoma, a chief in the Xhosa community who lived in the 1800s. Ntabeni uses Maqoma's lifelong struggle against the British as the backdrop for his novel The Broken River Tent, as Maqoma guides modern-day character Phila through the realities of fighting for their land.

Writer Mphuthumi Ntabeni speaks of the difficulty in writing about such a painful time in Xhosa history, but he says inspiration came from the fact that there are no books that speak of the land invasions in the Eastern Cape in the 1800s from a Xhosa point of view.

"I put psychological emotions and thinking behind the actual historical events," says Ntabeni.

 

Also included in this podcast: Nigerian writer Nnamoi Ehirin, author of Prince of Monkeys, his debut novel out in April, speaks about his favorite book from the Heinemann African classics series.

 


Related

  • Africa: Stories in the 55

    Life and sensuality in a refugee camp in Suliaman Addonia's "Silence is My Mother Tongue"

    Learn more

  • Africa: Stories in the 55

    Somali writer Ubah Cristina Ali Farah speaks of trauma intertwined with beauty in her story "Jujube"

    Learn more

  • Africa: Stories in the 55

    Zimbabwean novelist Tsitsi Dangarembga explores post-war trauma in "This Mournable Body"

    Learn more

  • Africa: Stories in the 55

    The perils for Zimbabweans crossing the border into South Africa personified in Sue Nyathi's new novel, The Gold-Diggers

    Learn more

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. ...
  5. next >
  6. last >
Features
 
Sorry but the period of time connection to the operation is exceeded.