Listen to RFI News
Expand Player
 
Listen Download Podcast
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 04/25 13h00 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 04/24 13h00 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 1300 - 1400 GMT
    News bulletin 04/23 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/05 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/04 13h00 GMT
  • 13h00 - 14h00 GMT
    News bulletin 04/03 13h00 GMT
To take full advantage of multimedia content, you must have the Flash plugin installed in your browser. To connect, you need to enable cookies in your browser settings. For an optimal navigation, the RFI site is compatible with the following browsers: Internet Explorer 8 and above, Firefox 10 and +, Safari 3+, Chrome 17 and + etc.
Asia-Pacific

Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal - fractious religious alliance can punch above its weight

media JUI-F leader Mullah Fazal ur-Rehman na.gov.pk

The Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA), a slimmed-down version of an earlier alliance of Islamist parties, has been weakened by factional spats and the not-always happy experience of local power. Its leading party was part of the outgoing coalition but its conservative politics make it an uneasy bedfellow for left-leaning secular parties.

The MMA – whose name means United Council of Action – is no more, according to one of the founding parties, Syed Munawar Hasan’s Jamaat-e-Islami, which refused to join when Jamaat Ulema-e-Islam (F) leader Fazal-ur-Rehman tried to revive it in 2012.

  • Leader: Fazl-ur-Rahman
  • Founders: Fazl-ur-Rahman, Sami ul-Haq, Qazi Hussain Ahmad
  • Founded: 2002
  • In power: North-West Frontier Province 2002-2008
     

 

The alliance had broken up in 2008 when JUI-F decided to take part in the election, breaking a boycott declared by the other parties.

Dossier: Pakistan General Election 2013

The MMA was originally set up in 2002 and won control of North-West Frontier Province (now Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa) on a wave of Pashtun opposition to the US-led toppling of the Taliban government in Afghanistan.

But it lost the province to the secular, Pashtun-nationalist ANP and, thanks to the boycott, only JUI-F was represented in parliament.

Although the religious parties have never won a large number of votes in elections, Pakistan’s fractured party system and the authority of Islam allow them to punch above their weight – they were given a significant boost by the devout dictator General Zia ul-Haq and JUI-F was able to join the PPP-led government in 2008.

The alliance now consists of Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam-F (JUI-F), Jamiat Ulema-e-Pakistan (JUP), Tehrik-e-Jafaria Pakistan (TJP), Jamiat Ahle Hadith and other smaller groups.

TJP is the only Shia-Muslim party in the Sunni-dominated coalition.

The alliance is theocratic and socially conservative, opposes Pakistan's cooperation with the US-led war on terror and, while operating within the law itself, has criticised some state repression of armed Islamists.

Related
 
Sorry but the period of time connection to the operation is exceeded.