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France

French press review 18 February 2016

media DR

All of the French newspapers are headlining on Brexit this morning and for once they all agree on the same thing: a British exit from the European Union would be bad for everybody.

"You want in or your want out?" reads Libération's headline, which lists the arguments in favor and against a possible British exit from the European Union.

So, should the EU, and France, "let the English go" asks the left-wing paper, hours ahead of a summit on the subject.

Your answer should be yes if you think the EU should move towards more political integeration, something that "London has always stopped" says Libé. A Brexit would also allow the EU to move away from "the dicatorship of financial markets".

But the biggest argument in favor of an exit, for France at least, is that it would force companies to move their HQ from London to Paris.

The case for staying in: "it would help create a Union at two speed" and "would avoid Germany from gaining too much influence". "Britain staying in would also help the EU keep its global influence" because the UK is close to the US explains Libé.

Le Figaro devotes three pages to the subject and goes all out against a possible British exit from the EU.

The journalists at Le Figaro are promising us hell if David Cameron loose his referundum.

The right-wing paper has numbers to make its case: Brexit would mean the loss of 0,33% of the EU's GDP. In some cases, such as for Ireland and Germany, it's even worse at around 3%

Le Figaro paints a bleak picture, and the forecasts for Britain aren't any better.Brexit would mean the loss of 2% of the British GDP and the fall of the pound, explains the daily.

Catholic La Croix thinks the European Union will move towards a "à la carte" approach. The idea with this approach would be to create to unions inside of the EU.

One agreeing with the "the ever closer union" concept, one of the founding principle of the EU and another one rejecting any kind of political integration, but with access to the common market.

Britain would of course become a member of the later explains La Croix.

However, the paper says there's already many different unions inside of the European Union. For one, Britain and Denmark have a lot of exemptions on EU rules. There's currently 28 member states - but not everybody is using the Euro, and not everybody is a member of the Schengen space, explains the paper.

Communist daily L'Humanité worries that trying to keep Britain in means "the burial of European solidarity". The daily analysed the deal that'll be discussed this Thursday in Brussels and the least we can say is that they're not happy with it.

If the proposed "emergency brake on the arrival of migranst" is adopted, it will mean the end of Europe's freedom of movement, one of its founding principle, argues L'Huma.

The paper also worries about the fact that if David Cameron wins, it would mean Europe could be reduced to the sole common market.

But really, if you ask L'Huma, Cameron is trying to damage workers' rights.

The British might be complaining about the EU having to many rulings, but it's europe, and not Britain that limit a workweek for being longer than 48 hours, it says.

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