Replay
The Sound Kitchen
The walking library
 
Listen Download Podcast
  • RFI English News flash 04h00 - 04h10 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 04h00 GMT
  • Paris Live AM 04h10 - 04h30 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/20 04h10 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 05h00 - 05h10 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 05h00 GMT
  • Paris Live AM 05h10 - 05h30 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/20 05h10 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 06h00 - 06h10 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 06h00 GMT
  • Paris Live AM 06h10 - 06h30 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/20 06h10 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 06h30 - 06h33 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 06h30 GMT
  • Paris Live AM 06h33 - 06h59 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/20 06h33 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 07h00 - 07h10 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 07h00 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 07h30 - 07h33 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 07h30 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 14h00 - 14h03 GMT Sat-Sun
    News bulletin 01/20 14h00 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 14h00 - 14h06 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/19 14h00 GMT
  • Paris Live Weekend 14h03 - 14h30 GMT Sat-Sun
    Features and analysis 01/20 14h03 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 14h06 - 14h30 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/19 14h06 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 14h30 - 14h33 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 14h30 GMT
  • Paris Live PM 14h33 - 14h59 GMT Mon-Fri
    Features and analysis 01/20 14h33 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 16h00 - 16h03 GMT Sat-Sun
    News bulletin 01/20 16h00 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 16h00 - 16h06 GMT Sat-Sun
    News bulletin 01/19 16h00 GMT
  • Paris Live Weekend 16h03 - 16h30 GMT Sat-Sun
    Features and analysis 01/20 16h03 GMT
  • RFI English News flash 16h30 - 16h33 GMT Mon-Fri
    News bulletin 01/20 16h30 GMT
  • Paris Live Weekend 16h33 - 17h00 GMT Sat-Sun
    Features and analysis 01/14 16h33 GMT
To take full advantage of multimedia content, you must have the Flash plugin installed in your browser. To connect, you need to enable cookies in your browser settings. For an optimal navigation, the RFI site is compatible with the following browsers: Internet Explorer 8 and above, Firefox 10 and +, Safari 3+, Chrome 17 and + etc.
Urgent

Paul Bocuse, nicknamed the "Pope" of French cuisine, has died at the age of 91 at his restaurant near Lyon.

Afp

Stem cell transplant offers hope for scleroderma patients

By AFP
media A study randomly assigned 36 scleroderma patients in the United States and Canada to receive a stem cell transplant GETTY/AFP/File

A stem cell transplant works better than medicine to extend the lives of people with scleroderma, an autoimmune disease in which the skin hardens and organs break down, researchers said Wednesday.

The findings in the New England Journal of Medicine point to a new way of treating the incurable disease, which affects some 2.5 million people worldwide, most of them women of childbearing age.

"Scleroderma hardens the skin and connective tissues and in its severe form leads to fatal organ failure, most often the lungs," said lead author Keith Sullivan, professor of medicine and cellular therapy at Duke University.

"In these severe cases, conventional drug therapies are not very effective long-term, so new approaches are a priority."

The study randomly assigned 36 scleroderma patients in the United States and Canada to receive a stem cell transplant. First they had to undergo high-dose chemotherapy and whole-body radiation to fully wipe out their malfunctioning immune system.

Then they were re-infused with their own blood stem cells that had been removed and treated to eliminate the faulty white blood cells.

Another 39 patients were randomly assigned to get 12 monthly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide, which is the conventional immune suppressing treatment for severe scleroderma.

Patients who underwent the stem cell transplant saw "significantly improved survival," said the study, which spanned 10 years and was carried out at 26 universities in the United States and Canada.

Patients in the stem cell group were more likely to see improvements in survival, organ function, quality of life and skin hardening.

"Overall survival at 72 months was 86 percent after transplant versus 51 percent after cyclophosphamide," said the report.

"These results show that individuals with poor-prognosis scleroderma can improve and live longer and that these advances appear durable," Sullivan said.

At the end of the study, just nine percent of the transplant group went back to taking anti-scleroderma drugs, compared to 44 percent in the control group.

The stem cell treatment carried a higher risk of death, however, along with more serious side effects in the short-term, including infections and low blood counts.

After 54 months, three percent of the transplant recipients died. No one in the cyclophosphamide group died from the treatment.

"Patients and their doctors should carefully weigh the pros and cons of intensive treatment with stem cell transplant, but this may hopefully set a new standard in this otherwise devastating autoimmune disease," Sullivan said.

 
Sorry but the period of time connection to the operation is exceeded.